Monthly Archives: November 2012

Indian Wars (1600’s & Early 1700’s)

Week 16: Indian Wars (1600’s and Early 1700’s)

VIEW: K – 8:  500 Nations A Jack Leustig Film Hosted by Kevin Costner.  View only the following scenes:

  • Disc 2 Episode 4:  Scene 17 “Decades of Peace”; Watch from King Philip to the end of disc.
  • Disc 3 Episode 5:  Watch from Scene 1 “Credits” to Scene 8 “Pontiac”

Note: Many Native Americans at this time wore very little clothing.  Many drawings accompany this documentary showing men and women wearing their traditional clothing.  (i.e. There are many images of almost naked Male and Female Native Americans.  Parents may want to preview this movie.)  This documentary is excellent but may be a bit hard for kids in grades K – 3 to understand.  Unfortunately, I have not been able to find any age-appropriate resources on this topic for K-3.

DISCUSS:

  • Who was King Philip? (Massasoit’s son, Indian chief)
  • Why was King Philip angry with the colonists? (they were trying to force their religion on them; they were taking over their lands)
  • What was King Philip’s war? (Philip rallied many Native Americans to fight against the colonists.)
  • What happened to Philip’s wife and son? (sold into slavery)
  • Who won the war? (Colonists)
  • Name some good and bad consequences to the Native American’s way of life from the fur trade? (gained new weapons & tools; stopped farming; many Native Americans spent all their time hunting animals to be able to trade)
  • What happened to the Sewee tribe? (wanted to be able to trade directly with Europe; built large canoes to sail across the ocean; were unprepared for storms at sea;  all either died or were sold into slavery;  every able-bodied man and woman went on the canoes; only children, sick, & elderly were left behind – Sewee nation perished)
  • Why did the Native Americans side with the French during the French & Indian War? (French traded with them, but did not come to take over the land)
  • Why was Pontiac such an important leader? (unified Indian tribes that used to be enemies in order to make a united attack on the English)
  • How successful was he? (was able to take over many English forts, but could not succeed in the end without the help from the French;  French did not help him because they signed a peace treaty with the English)

ACTIVITIES: K – 3: Draw your own picture of the French & Indian War

4 – 6: Write an essay telling about 3 new things you learned about Native Americans from this film.

7 – 8: Write an essay (5 paragraph – 3 proof)  telling about 3 new things you learned about Native Americans from this film.

Copyright November 24, 2012 by Gwen Fredette

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Salem Witch Trials

Week 15: Salem Witch Trials (1692)

READ: K – 3:  The Salem Witch Trials by Jane Yolen & Heidi  Stemple

4 – 5:  The Salem Witch Trials by Edward Dolan

6 – 8:  The Salem Witchcraft Trials by Karen Zeinert

DISCUSS:

  • Where did the Salem witch trials take place? (Massachusetts)
  • What religious group was involved with the trials? (Puritans)
  • T/F  Puritan children were able to play games and have free time to have fun. (F)
  • What happened to Betty & Abigail? (they got sick, rolled, convulsed, & shouted bizarre unintelligible words)
  • Why did Reverend Parris think a witch did that to them? (He had no other good explanation)
  • After the girls first accused the 3 women, were others accused? (yes)
  • What happened to them? (some were hung, one man was pressed to death, others were put in jail)
  • If people confessed to being witches were they hung? (no)
  • What was Spectral Evidence? (girls claimed to see ghosts during the trial to prove that suspects were guilty)
  • Who put an end to the trials? (Sir William Phips, the governor of Massachusetts)
  • Why do you think the girls accused so many people? (to get attention, etc.)
  • How did Phips change our court system? (said that “spectral evidence” could no longer be used in court)

ACTIVITIES:

K – 3: Draw your own picture of a Salem witch trial or color in this page from Unmusuem.org.  Click HERE.

4 – 6: Do the Salem Witchcraft trials wordsearch from Wordsearch fun.  Click HERE.

7 – 8: Do wordsearch above and write out the answers to the following questions:  Why do you think the girls involved in the Salem Witch Trials originally began shaking?  Explain your answer.  Did the governor of Massachusetts wait too long to get involved?  Explain your answer.  Should the father of the daughters involved and the daughters themselves have been punished for their actions?  Explain your answer.

Copyright November 17th, 2012 by Gwen Fredette

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Small Pox Epidemic

 Week 14: Small Pox Epidemic (1600’s)

READ: K – 5:  Read “Note” and look at pictures of smallpox victims on the internet. (Parents: Some of these images may be disturbing!  Please view these images first before showing them to your children!  To see photos click HERE,  HERE, and HERE. ) 

6 – 8:  Small Pox in the New World (Epidemic!) by Stephanie True Peters (Read Chps 1, 3, and Chapter 4 pgs 33-40)

NOTE:  Smallpox is a deadly disease.  Symptoms include headache, backache, fever, nausea, and a terrible rash that spreads all over the body.  The rash turns to blisters that fill with puss.  The blisters itch terribly and then turn to oozing sores that give off a terrible odor.  Survivors are permanently disfigured.  It spreads by sneeze, cough, or even by touching the clothing or blankets of a victim.  A person who survives the illness will never get it again.  Native Americans had never been exposed to it before.  9 out of 10 Native Americans who caught it died.  Widespread disease also caused starvation for people.  With so many people sick, there were not enough people to tend the fields.  People ran out of food and died.  There were many Indian tribes who were almost completely wiped out because of the disease.    Often colonists were able to take over land previously held by Native Americans when whole tribes died from the disease.  Unfortunately, there were some incidences of “biological warfare” by the colonists.  They deliberately sent blankets of smallpox victims to Native American settlements to kill tribes of people.    Many puritans believed that people who contracted the illness were being punished by God.

People do not get the disease today because of immunizations people receive as children.

DISCUSS:

  • What is Smallpox? (a deadly disease. )
  • What are its symptoms? (headache, backache, fever, nausea, terrible rash that spreads all over the body.  The rash turns to blisters that fill with puss.  The blisters itch terribly, then turn to oozing sores that have a terrible odor.  People who survive are disfigured.)
  • How does it spread? (sneeze, cough, touching blankets or clothing of victim)
  • Can a person who’s had it ever get it again? (no)
  • How did it affect Native Americans? (Thousands and thousands died.  9 out of 10 died)
  • Why did many people starve to death during Smallpox epidemics? (not enough people to tend fields)
  • How did Smallpox give the colonists new land? (They were able to take over land previously held by Indians)
  • Did Smallpox kill colonists too? (yes)
  • What is biological warfare? (when people purposely send diseases to kill others)
  • Were some colonists guilty of biological warfare? (yes)
  • What were Puritan’s views of the illness? (believed it was a punishment sent by God)
  • Do people get the illness today? (no – due to immunizations)

ACTIVITIES:

K – 3: Draw your own picture of a person suffering from Smallpox.

4 – 6: Write your own short story of a person getting Smallpox (1 page) OR pretend you are a newspaper reporter living in the 1600’s.  Write a newspaper article about the smallpox epidemic in your town.

7 – 8: Write your own short story of a person getting Smallpox. (2 pages) OR pretend you are a newspaper reporter living in the 1600’s.  Write a newspaper article about the smallpox epidemic in your town.

Copyright November 11, 2012 by Gwen Fredette

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Colonial Life (Part II)

Week 13: Colonial Life (Part II)

READ: K – 4:  Colonial Life (A True Book)  by Brendan January pgs 31 – end

5 – 8:  Your Travel Guide to Colonial America by Nancy Day pgs 50 – end


DISCUSS:

  • What foods did the colonists eat? (turkeys, oysters, berries, apples, food from homeland, pork, bacon, beans, pumpkin, deer, & seafood)
  • What did the colonists use for medicine? (doctors made them bleed, many believed in superstitious ways to cure themselves, such as: eating kidneys helped your kidneys. )
  • Who had better medicines, the colonists or Native Americans? (Native Americans.  Willow tree bark helped with headaches, black spruce needles helped with scurvy because they are rich in vitamin C)
  • What did Colonists do for fun? (hide & seek, tag, hopscotch, dominoes, sledding, ice skating, ninepins, swimming)

Discuss: Grades 5 – 8 –  What diseases did they suffer from? (small pox, scurvy, malaria, typhoid, dysentery)

ACTIVITIES:

K – 3: Coloring page from classroom clipart.com.  Click HERE.

4 – 6: Make a chart listing the 13 colonies, the founder of each colony, and the year each colony was founded.  Use one of these site pages for help:

  • Americanhistory.about.com “Colony List” – Click HERE.   OR
  • Americanhistory.about.com “Bl Colonial 13” – Click HERE.

7 – 8: Do activity for grades 4 – 6, AND list the major religions and exports for each colony.  You may use this page from Revive the Spirit.com for help.          Click HERE.

Copyright November 4, 2012 by Gwen Fredette

To reach last week’s post, Colonial Life (Part I) click HERE.

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