Monthly Archives: October 2013

Overview of Ancient Rome (Part II)

Week 11:  Overview of Ancient Rome (Part II)

 

READ:  K – 5:  The Romans: Life in Ancient Rome by Liz Sonneborn (Chps 4 – end)

6 – 8:  Your Travel Guide to Ancient Rome by Rita J. Markel (pgs 52 – end)

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NOTE: The books above cover the same material, but not in the same order.  All of the questions listed in today’s lesson are covered in chapters      4 – 6 of The Romans: Life in Ancient Rome.  Some of these questions are covered in today’s reading requirement for 6 – 8.  Some of these questions were covered in last week’s reading assignment for grades 6 through 8.  (Click here to get to last week’s post: https://ureadthru.wordpress.com/2013/10/18/overview-of-ancient-rome-part-i/)

 DISCUSS:

  • Describe Ancient Rome’s army? (best in the world, took over many foreign lands, completed many building projects)
  • Describe Ancient Rome’s aqueducts and sewer system? (aqueducts ran water into each building, sewer system carried dirty waste out of city)
  • For about 500 years Rome was a republic.  What was a republic? (system of government where people vote for others to govern them)
  • Name the most famous Roman leader? (Julius Caesar)
  • Who was Augustus Caesar? (first Roman emperor)
  • T/F There were famous poets, story writers, and good theaters in Ancient Rome. (true)
  • What language did the Romans speak? (Latin)

 

ACTIVITIES: 

 K – 2: Take a piece of paper and fold it in half and then in half again.  In the 4 quadrants draw 4 pictures representing famous people or places from Ancient Rome.

3 – 5: Write 4 – 6 sentences describing things you learned about Ancient Rome from today’s reading assignment.

6 – 8:  Write an essay describing life in Ancient Rome.  Include at least 4 characteristics of their culture or 4 of their achievements.

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Copyright October 24th, 2013 by Gwen Fredette

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Homeschool Writing Contest! (2013)

Dear Fellow Homeschooler,

I’m thrilled to announce that for the second year in a row I will be hosting a homeschool writing contest on my blog, “Philadelphia Homeschool”.  The contest is for any child currently being homeschooled (either traditional or virtual charter school) in the U.S. in grades 3 through 8.

Students will use this story starter to create a story of their own:

“Help!  Help!” my sister screamed frantically.

 I groaned.  What a drama queen!  What could it be this time?  Reluctantly, I followed the sounds of her cries …
 
God has graciously given us sponsors who are donating some fantastic prizes.  These include gift certificates to the Institute for Excellence in Writing, Subscriptions to SchoolhouseTeachers.com, writing curriculum (courtesy of Peace Hill Press) and gift cards to Amazon.com, Toys R Us, & Barnes & Noble.
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More details about the contest can be found by clicking on this link to my blog: http://phillyhomeschool.wordpress.com/2013/10/17/homeschool-writing-contest-2013/.
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Please feel free to let your friends and homeschool network(s) know about the contest.  Last year’s contest was a great success, and I look forward to an even greater response this year.
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May God continue to bless your homeschool adventure!
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Sincerely,
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Gwen Fredette
(U Read Thru History & Philadelphia Homeschool Blog)
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P.S. If you’d like to check out last year’s winning stories, please click on one or more of the following links:
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Posted by Gwen Fredette, October 21st, 2013

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Overview of Ancient Rome (Part I)

Week 10: Overview of Ancient Rome (Part I)

 

READ:  K – 5:  The Romans: Life in Ancient Rome by Liz Sonneborn (Chps 1 – 3)

6 – 8:  Your Travel Guide to Ancient Rome by Rita J. Markel (pgs 1 – 51)


NOTE:  The books above cover the same material, but not in the same order.  All of the questions listed in today’s lesson are covered in chapters       1 – 3 of The Romans: Life in Ancient Rome.  Some of these questions are covered in today’s reading requirement for 6 – 8.  Some of these questions a  6th – 8th grader won’t know the answers to until they finish the book next week.

 DISCUSS:

  • Name three classes of people who lived in Ancient Rome? (the very rich, the commoners, & slaves)
  • Did most kids in Ancient Rome go to school? (no, they learned at home; except for the very rich)
  • Did most girls learn to read and write? (no, learned to cook & sew)
  • What was a bathhouse? (a place where Romans went to take baths)
  • Did men and women go to bathhouses together? (no, bath times or houses were separate)
  • How often did they bathe? (once a day)
  • Did they use soap? (no, oil)
  • Describe the clothing of the Romans? (wore tunics with belts; women wore stolas over the tunics; rich women wore jewelry)
  • When did girls get married? (about age 14)
  • Get out your “Gods & Goddesses” chart from studying ancient Greece.  (See “Week 3: Greek & Roman Gods” from this site.) What is the same about the Roman gods? What is different?  Do some of these names sound familiar to you? Explain. (gods are the same; only their names have changed.  They have some of the same names as our planets.)
  • What was Saturnalia? (a holiday held to honor the god, Saturn, who was the god of farming)
  • What famous man preached to the Jews in Ancient Rome about salvation and was crucified? (Jesus)
  • At first how did the Romans feel about Christians? (didn’t like them; they had many of them killed)
  • What were the Romans famous for building? (roads, bridges, tunnels, monuments, temples, stores, baths, the Colosseum)
  • What building material were the Romans the first to use? (concrete)
  • How do you think the building of roads helped to spread Christianity? (made it easier for people to travel to various places, so it was easier for the gospel to spread)
  • What events were held at the Colosseum? (gladiator fights, prisoners forced to fight against animals or be eaten by them)
  • What events were held at the Circus Maximus? (chariot races)

ACTIVITIES: 

 K – 8: Create a map of Ancient Rome using this link for help: http://wps.ablongman.com/wps/media/objects/262/268312/art/figures/KISH106.jpg

Be sure to label the cities of Rome, Pompeii (ask your parent for help finding Pompeii), Athens, Alexandria, and Jerusalem.  Here is a blank map you can use: http://d-maps.com/carte.php?lib=the_roman_world_40_bc_map&num_car=1982&lang=en

K – 3: Roman soldier coloring page: http://www.edupics.com/coloring-page-roman-soldier-i4186.html

4 – 6: Think of and retell (in your own words) a Bible story that has a Roman soldier as one of the characters.  (For possibilities, see Luke 7:1-9, Matt 27:27-31, Acts 10:1- 7, John 19: 16 – 27, Luke 23:44- 49, Matt 27:62 – 15, Acts 22: 22-29)

7 – 8: Write about the following: Think of and retell (in your own words) a Bible story that has a Roman soldier as one of the characters.  (For possibilities, see Luke 7:1-9, Matt 27:27-31, Acts 10:1- 7, John 19: 16 – 27, Luke 23:44- 49, Matt 27:62 – 15, Acts 22: 22-29)  Then, write the answer to the following question in a short paragraph: The Ancient Roman soldiers were famous for building roads across the empire.  How might this have helped spread Christianity?  Explain.

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Copyright October 18, 2013 by Gwen Fredette

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Alexander the Great

Week 9: Alexander the Great

 

READ:  K – 5:  The Great Alexander the Great by Joe Lasker

6 – 8:  Alexander: The Boy Soldier Who Conquered the World by Simon Adams

 


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DISCUSS:

  • What was Bucephalus?  (Alexander’s horse)
  • How did Alexander win him? (as a child he made a bet with his father that he could ride him after others couldn’t)
  • Why was Bucephalus important? (always rode him into battle)
  • At what age did Alexander become king? (20)
  • T/F Alexander claimed to be a son of the gods. (true)
  • Why do you think Alexander claimed to be a son of the gods? (answers will vary; he believed it because he had conquered so much, he wanted others to believe it so they would be afraid of him; he wanted his soldiers to follow him, etc.)
  • What name did Alexander give to the cities he conquered? (Alexandria)
  • Why did Alexander originally begin to fight? (to unite different regions of Greece)
  • What group of people did he then wish to conquer? (The Persians)
  • Why was the city of Tyre hard to conquer? (it was on an island; he had no navy)
  • Why did Alexander want to conquer India? (he believed then he would have conquered the whole world)
  • Why did his soldiers want to go home? (tired of fighting)
  • What beast did the people of India use to fight against Alexander and his army? (elephants)
  • Why did the army commit mutiny in India? (monsoon downpour, tired, etc.)
  • How did Alexander die? (from disease)

Questions for Grades 6 – 8:

  • Why did Alexander lead his army through a desert? (perhaps to say he did, perhaps to discover, perhaps revenge for mutiny)
  • How did the trek through the desert affect his men? (maybe as many as half died)
  • Who was Hephaestion and how did his death affect Alexander? (best friend  for many years; grief –stricken; killed the doctor for not saving him)
  • What great power eventually conquered his lands after his death? (Ancient Rome)
  • Why was Alexander such an important figure in history? (conquered much of the then-known world, spread Greek language and culture throughout his conquered territories, this unity eventually enabled Christianity to spread throughout the region)
  • Is it fair to say that Alexander was cruel? (yes, crucified many, killed ¾ of a million people, did not listen to complaints of army)
  • Romans 8:37 “No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us.”  Reflect on Alexander the conqueror and this verse.  What does this mean to you?

ACTIVITIES:

All Grades: Using this link: http://www.mrsaustin.net/ancient-greece.html, or this link for help: http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/media/54536/Alexander-the-Greats-conquests-freed-the-West-from-the-menace.  Create a map of Alexander’s empire at its height.  This blank map can be used by students: http://www.eduplace.com/ss/maps/pdf/cent_swasia_nl.pdf

 K – 2: Color in this picture of Alexander and Bucephalus: http://softshack.blogspot.com/2010/05/megalomaniac.html

3 – 5: Why do you think Alexander claimed to be a son of the gods?  Do you think he really believed that or do you think he just wanted others to believe that?  Write a paragraph.

6 – 8:  Write an essay discussing the positive and negative effects of Alexander the Great’s conquests.

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Copyright October 11, 2013 by Gwen Fredette

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Ancient Greek Philosophers

Week 8: Greek Philosophers

 

READ:  K – 3:  How We Learned the Earth Is Round by Patricia Lauber

4 – 8:  Ancient Greece! :40 Hands-On Activities to Experience this Wondrous Age by Avery Hart & Paul Mantell (Read only pgs 72 – 79 “Think For Yourself: Philosophy”)


NOTE:  There are 4 important Great Greek Thinkers you need to remember:

  1. Pythagoras:  A great mathematician & philosopher
  2. Socrates: Great Philosopher.  Urged people to take a deeper look at their beliefs and spoke out against the gods.  This outraged many and he was given the option to drink poison or to leave Athens.  He drank the poison. 
  3. Plato: Great Philosopher.  Socrates’ student.  Wrote down many of Socrates’ teachings.  He also wrote about the existence of Atlantis.
  4. Aristotle: Great Philosopher.  Plato’s star student.  He eventually became the teacher of Alexander the Great.  He developed a classification system for science.

DISCUSS:

  • Who first discovered the earth was round? (The Greeks)
  • What does Philosophy mean? (love of wisdom)
  • T/F There were brilliant thinkers in Ancient Greece.  (true)
  • Name a famous Ancient Greek mathematician? (Pythagoras)
  • What great Philosopher spoke out against the gods and had to drink poison as a result? (Socrates)
  • What great Philosopher wrote down many of Socrates teachings? (Plato)
  • What great Philosopher taught Alexander the Great and organized a system of classification for science? (Aristotle)

Questions for Grades 4 – 8:

  • What lost city did Plato write about? (Atlantis)
  • What math theorem did Pythagoras conceive? (Pythagorean theorem:  A²+B²=C² for right triangle)
  • How did Aristotle feel about slavery? (thought some people were born to be slaves)
  • What was a Symposium? (meeting of Greeks who wanted to explore ideas)

ACTIVITIES: 

K – 3: Using a ball, a toothpick and an eraser, do the experiment with the “boat on the horizon” in your book.  Then take a sheet, a tie or sash, and some pins and try to design Ancient Greek clothing for yourself.

4 – 8:  Go to page 41 of your text.  Using the chart listed, write your first and last name in Greek.  (Students in Grades 6 – 8 can also try to write a short sentence in Greek.)  Then, according to pg 79 of your text, Socrates once asked this question at a Symposium: “What accomplishment or possession do you most value in yourself?”   Answer this question in paragraph form and then give reasons why you feel the way you do.

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Copyright October 4th, 2013 by Gwen Fredette

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