Monthly Archives: February 2016

Transcontinental Railroad

Week 2: Transcontinental Railroad

.

Read K – 3: Railroad! By Darice Bailer AND Read NOTE* 

4 – 6:  The Golden Spike by R. Conrad Stein OR Railroad Fever: Building the Transcontinental Railroad by Monica Halpern AND Read NOTE*      

7– 8: The Journal of Sean Sullivan by William Durbin (My Name is America Series) AND Read NOTE* 

* Note:

There were 2 Railroad companies building railroad tracks across America.  The Union Pacific (UP) was building from the east towards the West.  The Central Pacific (CP) was building from the west towards the East.  The goal was to have railroad tracks running the length of the United States.  The overseers for the UP were Jack and Dan Casement.  (They were brothers.)  The overseer for the CP was Charlie Crocker.

Charlie had a hard time finding workers to build his CP railroad.  A friend suggested that he hire Chinese workers.  He thought they would be too weak and small to handle the hard work, but after hiring 50 Chinese workers and seeing their progress, he quickly hired 50 more.  White workers got angry and threatened to quit because of the Chinese immigrants.  He let them go and hired more Chinese workers.  The Chinese immigrants worked hard and did not complain like the white workers.  They were less likely to fight and get drunk.

The UP hired many immigrants born in Poland and Germany, and they also hired many newly freed slaves.  But the majority of their workers were Irish immigrants.  The Irish worked hard but they also had a reputation for drinking, gambling, and fighting.

Congress promised railroad companies large amounts of money for every mile of track they completed.  Many towns formed close to where railroad tracks were laid.  The UP had easier terrain to lay tracks on; it was mostly prairie land.  The CP had to dig a huge tunnel through the Sierra Nevada Mountains.  Although Congress gave this land to the railroad companies, they ignored the fact they had promised this land to the Native Americans.  The Indians were angry; this was their land and they had nowhere else to go.  Indians often attacked UP railroad workers.  The CP had no problems with Native Americans; when Indians came to watch the work being done, Charlie hired them.

There was a race to see which company would reach Utah first.  Americans would read the newspapers every day to find out the progress the railroad companies were making.  The CP made the mistake of laying the tracks like a snake to avoid having to cut through hills.  The UP made the mistake of nailing tracks into snow and ice instead of the ground.  When the snow and ice melted the tracks were not secure.  The 2 railroad companies met at Promontory Point in Utah.  The last spike nailed into the ground was made of pure gold.  (It was quickly removed and replaced with a regular spike.)  Telegraphers were present to announce the news that it was completed.  The liberty bell chimed and great parades were held in many cities.  Overall, 20,000 men hammered 1,175 miles of track in 3 years.  It was a huge accomplishment!

Discuss:

  •  What were the names of the 2 railroad companies? (Central Pacific, Union Pacific)
  • What workers mostly laid tracks for the CP? (Chinese)
  • What workers mostly laid tracks for the UP? (Irish)
  • Why did the companies work so hard to complete the tracks? (Congress promised railroad companies huge amounts of land and money for each mile of track laid.)
  • Which company had easier land to work on? Why? (Union Pacific; they had to lay tracks on prairie land.  The Central Pacific had to dig tunnels through the Sierra Nevada Mountains.)
  • Which company had trouble with Indian attacks? (UP)
  • What mistakes did the companies make? (Did not always lay tracks straight; hammered tracks into snow and ice)
  • How did the U.S. hear the good news that the tracks were finished? (telegraph)

Activities:

K – 2: Transcontinental Railroad coloring page: http://www.colorluna.com/the-first-transcontinental-railroad-coloring-page/

3 – 4: Railroad Comparison Chart worksheet: railroad comparison

5 – 6: Do the following:

  1. Read this “Re-enactment of the Last Spike Ceremony” on this website: http://www.nps.gov/gosp/learn/kidsyouth/re-enactment-script-grades-4-6.htm
  2. Then answer questions from the “Last Spike Ceremony” worksheet: Last Spike Ceremony worksheet

7 – 8: Do the following:

  1. Read this “Re-enactment of the Last Spike Ceremony” on this website: http://www.nps.gov/gosp/learn/kidsyouth/re-enactment-script-for-grades-7-9.htm
  2. Then answer the questions from the “Last Spike Ceremony” worksheet: Last Spike Ceremony worksheet
  3. Finally write a short essay on one of the following topics on the back of your worksheet:
  • Describe some of the dangers Sean Sullivan and other workers faced while working on the railroad.
  • Describe some of the “unclean” conditions Sean experienced.
  • What bad habits did you see in Sean’s coworkers? How did their habits affect their work?
  • Toward what groups of people did Sean’s coworkers make racist remarks? Why do you think they felt as they did?

Copyright February 24th, 2016 by Gwen Fredette

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Charlotte Mason, Post Civil War Era

Civil War Reconstruction & Ku Klux Klan

Week 1: Civil War Reconstruction & Ku Klux Klan

.

Read K – 2: This topic is a bit complicated and heavy for this age group.  I recommend skipping this lesson and moving on to “Week 2”.

3 – 5:                      http://www.ducksters.com/history/civil_war/reconstruction.php

6 – 8: Reconstruction by Brendan January (Cornerstones of Freedom) & Watch “Origins of Ku Klux Klan” on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3jK02cwDwY

(This video is a bit intense; you may want to preview it before showing it to your students.)

Discuss:

  •  What was the “Reconstruction”? (Rebuilding of the South after the Civil War)
  • Why did the South have to be rebuilt? (much of southern states destroyed during the war)
  • What did the Southern states have to do to rejoin the Union? (take an oath to support the Union; 10% of the voters in a state had to take this oath; the state had to agree to make slavery illegal.)
  • What were “Black Codes?” (laws passed in the South that prevented blacks from voting, going to school, owning land, and getting jobs)
  • What 3 Amendments were added to  the Constitution?  (13th – Outlawed slavery; 14th – Black people were citizens and were protected equally by law, 15th – Gave all people the right to vote regardless of race)
  • How did the Union help the South?  (Built roads, helped with farms, built schools)
  • Why was Andrew Johnson called the “Veto President”? (He vetoed many laws passed by Congress to help black citizens.)
  • Where was Johnson from? (The South)

Questions for Grades 6 – 8:

  • What was the Freedman’s Bureau? (Group formed by Congress to help newly freed slaves adjust to new freedom.  Gave out food, clothes, and medicine, & set up hospitals and schools.)
  • Did Johnson want equal rights for blacks? (No)
  • Under Johnson could black people vote? (No)
  • What often happened to freed blacks from the South who tried to vote? (Attacked and killed)
  • What was a sharecropper? (A person who rented a piece of land and surrendered part of his crop as payment – almost treated like slaves)
  • What was the Ku Klux Klan? (group who dressed in white robes and declared white supremacy; they traveled at night attacking and killing blacks and black supporters)
  • T/F Southern states gradually fell back under white control? (T)
  • What happened to blacks after Union soldiers left the South? (endured racism, left unprotected, had their civil rights stripped from them.)

Activities:

K – 2: None

3 – 4: Worksheet on 13th, 14th, & 15 amendments: 13th – 15th amendments Use the information on this site for help: https://quizlet.com/8518056/amendments-13-14-15-flash-cards/

5 – 6: Do Black Codes Handout.doc  on this site: http://jhswbschools.sharpschool.com/staff_directory/social_studies/mr__daniel_doherty_/handouts_and_class_materials/  under “Week 9”  handouts

7 – 8: Reconstruction worksheet: [PDF] click HERE

 

Copyright February 17th, 2015 by Gwen Fredette

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Charlotte Mason, Post Civil War Era

Book List: Post Civil War Era

Book List: Post Civil War Era

Greetings Fellow Homeschoolers!   Following is a list of titles (organized by grade level) that will be used for the upcoming Year 5 unit study on the Post Civil War Era (see the outline tab at the top of this blog).  If your library does not carry these books, you may be able to obtain them through interlibrary loan.  Of course, all of these titles can also be purchased on Amazon.com or abebooks.com.

May God continue to bless your homeschool adventure!

– Gwen

Grades K – 1:

  1. None
  2. Railroad! By Darice Bailer AND Read NOTE* (attached to lesson plan)
  3.  Susan B. Anthony: Fighter for Women’s Rights by Deborah Hopkinson OR Susan B. Anthony by Alexandra Wallner
  4.  The Great Chicago Fire of 1871 by Kay Melchisedech Olson
  5. Booker T. Washington by Suzanne Slade
  6. Wagon Wheels by Barbara Brenner AND Read NOTE*
  7. Clouds of Terror by Catherine Welch
  8. The Long Way to A New Land by Joan Sandin
  9.  Yippee – Yah! A Book about Cowboys and Cowgirls by Gail Gibbons
  10. Read the information on this site: http://www.fasttrackteaching.com/burns/Unit_2_Westward/U2_Impact_on_Indians.html
  11.  Alexander Graham Bell by Nest Entertainment
  12. A Picture Book of Thomas Alva Edison by David Adler
  13.  “Liberty!” by Allan Drummond
  14.  Annie and Helen by Deborah Hopkinson & Raul Colon OR  A Picture Book of Hellen Keller by David Adler OR View Helen Keller by Nest Entertainment
  15. A Picture Book of George Washington Carver by David Adler
  16.  America: The Story of Us (Disc 2: Chapters Heartland& Cities (Just to end of Statue of Liberty)

Grade 2:

  1. None
  2. Railroad! By Darice Bailer AND Read NOTE* (attached to lesson plan)
  3.  Susan B. Anthony: Fighter for Women’s Rights by Deborah Hopkinson OR Susan B. Anthony by Alexandra Wallner
  4.  The Great Chicago Fire of 1871 by Kay Melchisedech Olson
  5. Booker T. Washington by Suzanne Slade
  6. Wagon Wheels by Barbara Brenner AND Read NOTE*
  7. Clouds of Terror by Catherine Welch
  8. The Long Way to A New Land by Joan Sandin
  9.  Yippee – Yah! A Book about Cowboys and Cowgirls by Gail Gibbons
  10. Read the information on this site: http://www.fasttrackteaching.com/burns/Unit_2_Westward/U2_Impact_on_Indians.html
  11.  Ahoy, Ahoy! Are you there? – A Story of Alexander Graham Bell by Robert Quackenbush AND (Optional) Alexander Graham Bell by Nest Entertainment
  12. A Picture Book of Thomas Alva Edison by David Adler
  13.  “Liberty!” by Allan Drummond
  14.  Annie and Helen by Deborah Hopkinson & Raul Colon OR  A Picture Book of Hellen Keller by David Adler OR View Helen Keller by Nest Entertainment
  15. A Picture Book of George Washington Carver by David Adler
  16.  America: The Story of Us (Disc 2: Chapters Heartland& Cities (Just to end of Statue of Liberty)

Grade 3:

  1. Read http://www.ducksters.com/history/civil_war/reconstruction.php
  2. Railroad! By Darice Bailer AND Read NOTE* (attached to lesson plan)
  3.  Susan B. Anthony: Fighter for Women’s Rights by Deborah Hopkinson OR Susan B. Anthony by Alexandra Wallner
  4.  The Great Chicago Fire of 1871 by Kay Melchisedech Olson
  5. Booker T. Washington by Suzanne Slade
  6. Wagon Wheels by Barbara Brenner AND Read NOTE*
  7. Clouds of Terror by Catherine Welch
  8. The Long Way to A New Land by Joan Sandin & The Long Way Westward by Joan Sandin
  9.  Yippee – Yah! A Book about Cowboys and Cowgirls by Gail Gibbons
  10. Read the information on this site: http://www.fasttrackteaching.com/burns/Unit_2_Westward/U2_Impact_on_Indians.html
  11.  Ahoy, Ahoy! Are you there? – A Story of Alexander Graham Bell by Robert Quackenbush AND (Optional) Alexander Graham Bell by Nest Entertainment
  12. A Picture Book of Thomas Alva Edison by David Adler
  13.  “Liberty!” by Allan Drummond
  14.  Annie and Helen by Deborah Hopkinson & Raul Colon OR  A Picture Book of Hellen Keller by David Adler OR View Helen Keller by Nest Entertainment
  15. George Washington Carver by Andy Carter
  16.  America: The Story of Us (Disc 2: Chapters Heartland& Cities (Just to end of Statue of Liberty)

Grade 4:

  1. Read http://www.ducksters.com/history/civil_war/reconstruction.php
  2. The Golden Spike by R. Conrad Stein OR Railroad Fever: Building the Transcontinental Railroad by Monica Halpern AND Read NOTE*
  3.  Fighting for Equal Rights: A Story about Susan B. Anthony by Maryann Weidt
  4.  The Great Chicago Fire by Janet McHugh OR The Story of the Chicago Fire by Conrad Stein OR I Survived the Great Chicago Fire, 1871 by Lauren Tarshis  (If you read this third book, be sure to read “Walking in Oscar’s Footsteps” and “Questions and Answers about the Chicago Fire and More” at the end of the book.)
  5. Booker T. Washington by Suzanne Slade
  6. Wagon Wheels by Barbara Brenner AND Read NOTE*
  7. Clouds of Terror by Catherine Welch
  8. The Long Way to A New Land by Joan Sandin & The Long Way Westward by Joan Sandin
  9.  Wild West Days by David King (Read all “story” portions of the book)
  10. Read the information on this site: http://www.fasttrackteaching.com/burns/Unit_2_Westward/U2_Impact_on_Indians.html
  11.  Alexander Graham Bell and the Telephone by Christine Webster
  12. Thomas Edison (History Maker Bios) by Shannon Zemlicka
  13.  “Maiden Voyage: The Story of the Statue of Liberty” by Stephen Krensky or Lady Liberty: A Biography by Doreen Rappaport
  14.  Disney’s The Miracle Worker (actress Hallie Kate Eisenberg)
  15. George Washington Carver by Andy Carter
  16.  America: The Story of Us (Disc 2: Chapters Heartland& Cities (Just to end of Statue of Liberty)

Grade 5:

  1. Read http://www.ducksters.com/history/civil_war/reconstruction.php
  2. The Golden Spike by R. Conrad Stein OR Railroad Fever: Building the Transcontinental Railroad by Monica Halpern AND Read NOTE*
  3.  Fighting for Equal Rights: A Story about Susan B. Anthony by Maryann Weidt
  4.  The Great Chicago Fire by Janet McHugh OR The Story of the Chicago Fire by Conrad Stein OR I Survived the Great Chicago Fire, 1871 by Lauren Tarshis  (If you read this third book, be sure to read “Walking in Oscar’s Footsteps” and “Questions and Answers about the Chicago Fire and More” at the end of the book.)
  5. Booker T. Washington (Journey to Freedom) by Don Troy
  6. On the Banks of Plum Creek (pgs 1 – 141 only) by Laura Ingalls Wilder AND Read NOTE*
  7. On the Banks of Plum Creek (pgs 142 – end)by Laura Ingalls Wilder
  8. The Long Way to A New Land by Joan Sandin & The Long Way Westward by Joan Sandin
  9.  Wild West Days by David King (Read all “story” portions of the book)
  10. 500 Nations DVD Watch Episode 7: Scene 7 “Indian Slavery” to end of scene 14 “Fates of Sitting Bull & Crazy Horse”  Then watch all of Episode 8.  And read information on this site: http://www.fasttrackteaching.com/burns/Unit_2_Westward/U2_Impact_on_Indians.html
  11.  Alexander Graham Bell and the Telephone by Christine Webster
  12. Thomas Edison (History Maker Bios) by Shannon Zemlicka
  13. “Maiden Voyage: The Story of the Statue of Liberty” by Stephen Krensky or Lady Liberty: A Biography by Doreen Rappaport
  14. Disney’s The Miracle Worker (actress Hallie Kate Eisenberg)
  15. A Pocketful of Goobers by Barbara Mitchell
  16.  America: The Story of Us (Disc 2: Chapters Heartland& Cities (Just to end of Statue of Liberty)

Grade 6:

  1. Reconstruction by Brendan January (Cornerstones of Freedom) & Watch “Origins of Ku Klux Klan” on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3jK02cwDwY (This video is a bit intense; you may want to preview it before showing it to your students.)
  2. The Golden Spike by R. Conrad Stein OR Railroad Fever: Building the Transcontinental Railroad by Monica Halpern AND Read NOTE*
  3.   Susan B. Anthony: Fighter for Women’s Rights by Pamela Levin OR Susan B. Anthony: Daring to Vote by Barbara Parker
  4.  The Great Chicago Fire by Janet McHugh OR The Story of the Chicago Fire by Conrad Stein OR I Survived the Great Chicago Fire, 1871 by Lauren Tarshis  (If you read this third book, be sure to read “Walking in Oscar’s Footsteps” and “Questions and Answers about the Chicago Fire and More” at the end of the book.)
  5. Booker T. Washington (Journey to Freedom) by Don Troy AND “Atlanta Compromise” speech: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nAQhwqUQ5Z4
  6. On the Banks of Plum Creek (pgs 1 – 141 only) by Laura Ingalls Wilder AND Read NOTE*
  7. On the Banks of Plum Creek (pgs 142 – end)by Laura Ingalls Wilder
  8. What was Ellis Island?  By Patricia Brennon Demuth
  9.  Zayda was a Cowboy (Chp 2 – end) by June Levitt Nislick (Point out glossary in back of book to help children with Yiddish words)
  10. 500 Nations DVD Watch Episode 7: Scene 7 “Indian Slavery” to end of scene 14 “Fates of Sitting Bull & Crazy Horse”  Then watch all of Episode 8.  And read information on this site: http://www.fasttrackteaching.com/burns/Unit_2_Westward/U2_Impact_on_Indians.html
  11.  Alexander Graham Bell and the Telephone by Christine Webster
  12. Thomas Edison (History Maker Bios) by Shannon Zemlicka
  13. “Maiden Voyage: The Story of the Statue of Liberty” by Stephen Krensky or Lady Liberty: A Biography by Doreen Rappaport
  14. Disney’s The Miracle Worker (actress Hallie Kate Eisenberg)
  15. A Pocketful of Goobers by Barbara Mitchell
  16.  America: The Story of Us (Disc 2: Chapters Heartland& Cities (Just to end of Statue of Liberty)

Grades 7 – 8:

  1. Reconstruction by Brendan January (Cornerstones of Freedom) & Watch “Origins of Ku Klux Klan” on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3jK02cwDwY (This video is a bit intense; you may want to preview it before showing it to your students.)
  2. The Journal of Sean Sullivan by William Durbin (My Name is America Series) AND Read NOTE*
  3.   Susan B. Anthony: Fighter for Women’s Rights by Pamela Levin OR Susan B. Anthony: Daring to Vote by Barbara Parker
  4.  The Great Fire by Jim Murphy
  5. Booker T. Washington (Journey to Freedom) by Don Troy
  6. On the Banks of Plum Creek (pgs 1 – 141 only) by Laura Ingalls Wilder AND Read NOTE*
  7. On the Banks of Plum Creek (pgs 142 – end)by Laura Ingalls Wilder
  8. What was Ellis Island?  By Patricia Brennon Demuth
  9.  Zayda was a Cowboy (Chp 2 – end) by June Levitt Nislick (Point out glossary in back of book to help children with Yiddish words)
  10. 500 Nations DVD Watch Episode 7: Scene 7 “Indian Slavery” to end of scene 14 “Fates of Sitting Bull & Crazy Horse”  Then watch all of Episode 8.  And read information on this site: http://www.fasttrackteaching.com/burns/Unit_2_Westward/U2_Impact_on_Indians.html
  11.  Who Was Alexander Graham Bell? by Bonnie Bader
  12. Who Was Thomas Alva Edison?  by Margaret Firth  AND Read these famous quotes by Thomas Edison: http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/t/thomas_a_edison.html
  13. What is the Statue of Liberty? By Joan Holub
  14. Disney’s The Miracle Worker (actress Hallie Kate Eisenberg)
  15. A Pocketful of Goobers by Barbara Mitchell
  16.  America: The Story of Us (Disc 2: Chapters Heartland& Cities (Just to end of Statue of Liberty)

 

  • * All Notes* are attached to lesson plans.

 

Posted by Gwen Fredette on February 11, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Book List, Post Civil War Era

Outline: Post Civil War Era

OUTLINE: Winter & Spring 2016 — Post Civil War Era

Greetings Fellow Homeschoolers!

Hope your school year has been joyful and productive!  Beginning next week, I will be posting history lesson plans on the “Post Civil War Era”.  The lessons will be similar in format to lessons you’ve already seen and used from this “U Read Thru History” site.  Each week readings will be suggested for different grade levels, discussion questions will be listed, and activities will be suggested per grade level.  I hope and pray these lessons will be a blessing to you and your family!

Following is the outline for the Post Civil War Era Unit Study:

Winter & Spring 2016 (American History)

Post Civil War Era Unit Study

  • Week 1: Civil War Reconstruction & Ku Klux Klan
  • Week 2: Transcontinental Railroad
  • Week 3: Susan B. Anthony
  • Week 4: Great Chicago Fire
  • Week 5: Booker T. Washington
  • Week 6: Life in the Midwest
  • Week 7: Grasshopper Plagues
  • Week 8: Immigration
  • Week 9: Cowboys
  • Week 10: Native Americans of the Plains and the West
  • Week 11: Alexander Graham Bell
  • Week 12: Thomas Edison
  • Week 13: Statue of Liberty
  • Week 14: Helen Keller
  • Week 15: George Washington Carver
  • Week 16: Post Civil War Presidents & History Review
  • Week 17: Test: Post Civil War Era Unit Study

If you have any questions about these History Lesson Plans, please feel free to email me.  My email is gwen.silverliningpress@juno.com.  If you’ve found great resources that might be a help to others using this curriculum, please feel free to write messages on the comments section of each post for others to see.  Thanks!  – Gwen

Posted by Gwen Fredette on February 2nd, 2016

Leave a comment

Filed under Post Civil War Era